Category Archives: Politricks

Mexico Legalizes Medical Marijuana


leafly.com

A decree issued by Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto today confirmed that Mexico has legalized cannabis for medicinal use after overwhelming support from Mexico’s Lower House of Congress.

Peña Nieto was once a vehement opponent of cannabis legalization, but has since called for a re-examination of global drug policy after a nationwide public debate on legalization in early 2016. “So far, the solutions [to control drugs and crime] implemented by the international community have been frankly insufficient,” Peña Nieto told the 2016 United Nations General Assembly Special Sessions in April 2016. “We must move beyond prohibition to effective prevention.”

Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto
Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto 

Last year, Peña Nieto even went so far as to introduce a measure that would allow Mexican citizens to possess up to an ounce of cannabis without repercussions, but the bill stalled in Congress.

The medical marijuana bill sailed through the Senate with ease in December 2016, and Mexico’s lower house in parliament passed the bill in April with a vote of 347-7 in favor of approval. Mexico’s Secretary of Health, Dr. José Narro Robles, voiced his support for the measure, saying, “I welcome the approval of the therapeutic use of cannabis in Mexico.”

The decree was issued by the president today and specifies that the Ministry of Health will be tasked with drafting and implementing the regulations of “public policies regulating the medicinal use of pharmacological derivatives of cannabis sativa, indica and Americana or marijuana, including tetrahydrocannabinol, its isomers and stereochemical variants, as well as how to regulate the research and national production of them.”

Peña Nieto’s decree effectively eliminates the criminalization of the medicinal use of cannabis, THC, CBD, and all cannabis derivatives, as well as legalizing the production and distribution of cannabis for medicinal and therapeutic uses.

“The ruling eliminates the prohibition and criminalization of acts related to the medicinal use of marijuana and its scientific research, and those relating to the production and distribution of the plant for these purposes,” stated the Lower House of Parliament, known as La Cámara de Diputados.

Currently, the only cannabis that will be permitted must contain 1% or less of tetrahydrocannabinol, and the Ministry of Health will be required to study the medicinal and therapeutic effects of cannabis before creating the framework for a medical marijuana program infrastructure.

There will certainly still be hurdles to overcome on the bumpy road to medical marijuana, but Mexico just surpassed the biggest obstacle so far.

Mexican Gasoline Entrepreneurs


Video from Mexico News Daily: government drone shows at least 148 trucks are seen lined up on a road waiting for hours to enter a large fuel supply depot operated by pipeline thieves near the Puebla-Orizaba highway in February.

Bajadock: The depot is known

MEXICO-PETROL-THEFT-EXPLOSION

Bloomberg.com

  • Shootout between soldiers and fuel thieves leaves 11 dead
  • Illegal pipeline taps cost Pemex $220 million over six years

Foreign companies looking to supply gasoline to Mexico are taking a hard look at planned investments after a series of fuel thefts escalated into a bloodbath last week in the state of Puebla.

A gun battle May 3 between soldiers and huachicoleros, the local nickname for fuel thieves, left 11 people dead and many more injured and triggered protests in Puebla, where pipelines are often tapped to steal gasoline. Companies looking to import fuel into Mexico from the U.S. like Howard Energy Partners, and BioUrja Trading LLC, are concerned about the uptick of the problem.

Soldiers stand in front of the flames generated by a fire in a clandestine fuel valve May 7.

Photographer: Jose Castanares/AFP via Getty Images

“It’s part of a worrisome trend that investors will take a look at and price into the offers that they make and the amount of investment that they decide to put into Mexico,” John Padilla, managing director of energy-consulting firm IPD Latin America, said by phone from Bogota.

Mexican fuel thefts have escalated in the past year, as the government abolished subsidies. The policy known as “gasolinazo,” or fuel-price slam, pushed up pump prices by as much as 20 percent in early 2017 and led to riots and blockades at some fuel terminals. Petroleos Mexicanos has covered the cost associated with the thefts, but it’s unclear whether the state oil company will try to pass them on to private importers in the future.

“Fuel theft is a significant concern for many companies going into Mexico and we don’t know that the government is doing anything in order to help alleviate that risk,” Rajan Vig, BioUrja’s head of Origination for Mexico, said by phone from Houston. BioUrja is seeking to import fuel into Mexico and is in talks with the government and banks to address the fuel-theft issue, but “we need the government to be on our side,” he said.

Illegal taps surged last year, resulting in losses of 2.2 billion of liters, or approximately 581.2 million gallons of fuel, a 24 percent increase from 2015. Disabling fuel pipeline taps cost Pemex around $220 million in the past six years, an amount that has risen more than 10-fold over the period, Mexican newspaper Milenio reported Monday, citing Pemex data.

“It’s a very large concern of ours,” Mike Howard, chief executive officer of Howard Energy, which is building a refined-product pipeline complex in northern Mexico, said by phone from San Antonio. “We’ve looked at all kinds of security measures including drones, above-ground cameras, everything that you can imagine to protect the product.”

The company is also investing in advanced leak-detection technology and considering burying its pipelines deeper in some locations. Huachicoleros typically dig up Pemex pipelines with a shovel because they are buried close to the surface.

“It’s an ongoing conversation that we’re having with our customers and with stakeholders in Mexico,” Howard said.

One of the murkier issues for the burgeoning private-fuel-import sector is who will cover the cost of product stolen from pipelines or terminals leased by Pemex. Tesoro Corp., which operates seven refineries in the U.S., won the first auction for capacity on Pemex’s pipelines and storage facilities on May 2. Commodity traders such as Trafigura Beheer BV and Koch Supply & Trading LP have applied for fuel-import permits.

Gasoline robberies are “a loss that Pemex just seems to absorb, and you can’t really expect the private sector to do that,” Robert Campbell, head of oil products research at industry consultant Energy Aspects Ltd. said by phone from New York. “Mexico’s justice system does not exactly inspire confidence. These are the sort of issues that really need to be worked out.”

Pemex is reinforcing its efforts to combat fuel theft, including tracking down black markets where the fuel is sold and increasing surveillance on its pipelines, Jose Antonio Gonzalez Anaya, Pemex’s chief executive officer said in a May 4 interview with Bloomberg. Gonzalez Anaya went to Colombia last year to learn new approaches to fight the crime from Ecopetrol SA, Colombia’s state oil producer that has grappled with frequent guerrilla attacks on its pipeline system.

“We are working on different fronts,” Gonzalez Anaya said. “It involves a lot of people, a lot of agencies. There’s not a silver bullet for this problem.”

 

Baja: Lawless State


Homicide investigations in Baja California are not very effective and business leaders’ concerns over worsening violence are justified, state and municipal authorities admitted yesterday.

Attorney General Perla del Socorro Ibarra told a conference in Tijuana that her staff are working 24 hours a day, but in percentage terms the effectiveness of their efforts “is not high” because of the high number of cases.

There have been more than 500 homicides in Tijuana so far this year.

The violence prompted business leaders to issue an SOS on Monday. The president of a citizens’ council on state security warned at a press conference that Baja California “is becoming a lawless state.”

“This,” said Juan Manuel Hernández Niebla, “is an SOS.”

Another business leader called for a single-command police force coordinated by the Army that would be capable of “attacking the organized crime structure.”

Kurt Honold Morales said there is no sign of effectiveness in the actions by security forces.

Also at yesterday’s conference, a forum on addictions and security at the Autonomous University of Baja California, Tijuana’s Public Security Secretary commented that authorities must listen to the complaints.

Marco Antonio Sotomayor agreed that they are justified. He said the municipality has “a very clear strategy, and one that has been strengthened, but it is also true that we have not achieved the results we wanted.”

Containing the violence was one of the desired results but that, he said, has not been accomplished.

Sotomayor observed that there have been successes operationally speaking, citing the seizure last weekend of 15 firearms.

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Alarm to industrial wave of violence

General information
by AFN.
ENSENADA BC, MAY 17, 2017 (AFN) .- Jorge Eduardo Cortés Ríos, president of the National Chamber of the Transformation Industry of Ensenada (Canacintra), called on the authorities of the three orders of government to establish a strategy Effective way to stop the wave of violence in the Entity.

The president of Canacintra reported that in addition to the killings, there are cases of extortion, express kidnappings, business robbery, vehicle theft, land collection, many of them not reported by the victims due to fear or lack of results.

He urged that concrete measures be taken, with targets and defined dates, coordinated by security corporations, that the Police Operations Center (COP) cameras be repaired and that they join the Communication and Command Center (C4).

“It is also urgent that the contracting, training, equipment and control of the municipal police be strengthened, that the failures of the New Criminal Justice System that favor impunity, that the crimes be clarified and punish the criminals be corrected.

In an event that he described as unprecedented for Ensenada, he said, “we are returning to levels of violence that we believed had already been overcome, requiring real and effective coordination between federal, state and municipal police corporations with the armed forces. Leave to these all the responsibility “.

“The perception of insecurity, unfortunately justified by the figures, places a high risk on investment and tourism, one of the few sectors that have maintained some economic dynamism in recent years and could inhibit some projects in this area, which Would be disastrous for the economy, “said Cortes Ríos.

The industrialist insisted on the urgency of stopping the criminal wave, investigating and punishing those responsible, to prevent other countries from continuing to issue alerts to stop their citizens from traveling to Mexican states and cities with high levels of violence.

He recalled that since mid-2016, there are restrictions on the part of the United States Department of State so that Americans do not travel to destinations like Baja California and the municipality of Ensenada. Added that just this April 22 the United Kingdom also issued a recommendation to its citizens, a situation that inhibits the arrival of visitors from that country to the region, insisted the leader.

To date, 58 people are reported killed in the municipality; Which has caused alarm in the industrial sector of Ensenada by the large number of victims, but also by the negative effects that it may have on the economy of the already repressed region.

He indicated that according to information collected, 30 crimes have been committed in the southern part of the municipality, 28 in the urban spot, in the conurbation zone and in the Valle de Guadalupe, so far in 2017; Which he said far exceeded the total number of homicides committed throughout 2016, he said.

Cortes Ríos stated that the most worrying of all is the upward trend, since only in the last week have been registered at least three murders in the northern rural area; Another alarming figure is the number of women who died violently, who already number 12, a situation that generates even greater uncertainty among the population.

In order for the city to progress, it requires investments, that existing companies can operate without surprises, that there are more jobs, generate taxes; But for that, a climate of tranquility free of violence is required, “said Jorge Eduardo Cortés Ríos.

Baja Crime Crisis


Bajadock: We posted above photo attached to December 2016 article on police checking seatbelt compliance and warning drivers of cell phone use while driving. This is the proverbial rearranging deck chairs on the Titanic, per the following:

elvigia.net

Faced with increasing levels of insecurity, impunity and corruption in Baja California, the Citizen’s Council of Public Security and Coparmex, demanded strong and effective actions by the federal, state and municipal governments to fight criminals.

In a press conference, Juan Manuel Hernández Niebla, president of the Public Citizen’s Council of Public Security, Faisal Díaz Nassif, president of the Citizen Committee of Public Security, and Coparmex leaders, Armando León Ptacnik and Jorge Nava Jiménez, demanded that officials comply With their responsibilities.

In Baja California, all crimes go up month by month, Hernández Niebla said, and the culture of non-reporting also increases in the face of the authority’s lack of capacity to investigate and punish.

The lack of crime prevention programs is increasing intrafamily violence and addictions, making Baja California youth a conducive breeding ground for crime, and a prison system that is also in crisis, said the president Of the Public Security Council.

It seems, he said, that the citizens should be abandoned, before an insensible authority, without strategy that minimizes a situation that is becoming critical.
Baja California appears to be a day-to-day entity without a law, Hernández Niebla emphasized.

Therefore, we asked the Governor Francisco Vega to shortly authorize the project to implement the new Criminal Justice System, allocate more resources to the State Attorney General’s Office, to have more trained personnel, and to improve The efficiency of the inquiries and using state-of-the-art technology.

It also requires that both the State Government and municipal governments submit a strategic public safety program in three months, with concrete and time-bound targets and results based on indicators that allow them to evaluate their actions and performance.

We want, said Hernández Niebla, that the governors, governor and mayors, assume their responsibility to provide security to the Baja California.

Border Wall Prototype at Bar


Hennessey’s Facebook Page

Bajadock: What company manufactured the inflatable wall?  How many green cards did Hennessey give away?  Is the real Isabel Orlando filing a lawsuit?

Mexico Legalizes Medical Marijuana


San Diego Red

The Lower House has approved the use of marijuana for medical purposes, in a historic vote that would also allow the regulated study of the cannabis sativa plant.

With 301 votes in favor and 88 against, the Representatives approved the initiative of President Enrique Peña Nieto, which was sent to Congress on April 21, 2016, but without the provision to legalize the marijuana for recreational uses with which he came.

Members of the National Action Party (PAN) managed to clear nine articles of the initiative, to ensure its approval. However, the new article 198 of the Federal Criminal Code now says:

“The planting, cultivation or harvesting of marijuana plants shall not be punishable when these activities are carried out for medical and scientific purposes in the terms and conditions of the authorization issued for that purpose by the Federal Executive.”

It gives new power to the Ministry of Health to “design and implement public policies that regulate the medicinal use of pharmacological derivatives of cannabis sativa, or American marijuana, including tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) with its isomers and stereochemical variants, as well as the regulation of the research and national production of it, ” this according to El Financiero.

Does it mean that you can already cross medical marijuana from San Diego to Tijuana?

Not necessarily, because information about when this law goes into effect or whether it is permitted to import medical marijuana from other countries, such as the United States, is missing. But it does make clear that this change “eliminates the prohibition and criminalization of acts related to the medicinal use of marijuana and its scientific research, and those that concern the production and distribution of the plant for these purposes.”

It is still illegal to cultivate, negotiate or distribute marijuana for recreational use, but it should be remembered that if a citizen has less than 5g in his or her position, there is no penalty or cause for arrest. Now less if it is for medicinal use; any amount.

More Ensenada Beach Shit


Ensenada.net

A drain of sewage water toward the beach Canalep 1 was reported Monday morning, same that was treated and tempered with chlorine to avoid side effects towards the sea.

The pipe found by citizens is managed by the State Public Service Commission of Ensenada (CESPE), who merely replied that “there’s a serious problem.”

According to documents, the citizen denounces attended the National Water Commission (Conagua) who immediately raised a report.

In it, the parastatal communicate about the breakup of a collector 30 inches in Granite Street and Pedro Loyola, Punta Banda fractionation, the collector is supplied by the industrial cárcamo extension located Grijalva River.

So it was necessary to derive the raw water to the stream of industrial arroyo Gallo, so they cut the supply of drinking water and applied chlorine black water.

Local residents reported that at 07:00 am while driving through the area found the drainage of sewage that gave off an unbearable smell.

Border Wall History Lessons


SDUT

Competition to build President Donald Trump’s border wall is underway with 467 companies nationwide, including 23 from San Diego, submitting bids and designs to construct what was a centerpiece promise of Trump’s campaign.

Fencing and barriers are nothing new along the U.S.-Mexico border. For nearly 30 years, fencing made from landing mats, steel mesh and concrete-filled steel bollards have been erected along nearly 700 miles of the border.

Much of that was constructed between 2007 and 2015, when the government spent an estimated $2.5 billion on border fencing projects. The work was done in populated border areas, including San Diego, and along desert mesas and in small towns in Arizona and Texas.

Much remains unknown about Trump’s wall, like what it would look like, how much it would cost, and how much more of the 2,000-mile Southwest border it would cover.

Yet a look back at some of the fencing projects undertaken during the border building boom and what has happened since they were completed can give a sense of what may be in store for border residents if the wall is constructed.

From Smuggler’s Gulch in San Diego, which was filled in with nearly 2 million cubic yards of dirt to form a massive berm after a years-long legal battle, to the Lower Rio Grande area of Texas, border barriers and fencing have helped reduce the number of people entering the United States illegally.

And they have also left a mark on the landscape that critics said have led to other problems such as flooding and erosion.

“It’s not just build the wall and forget about it,” said Oscar Romo, a researcher with UC San Diego who coordinated the Tijuana River National Estuarine Research Reserve‘s coastal training program for about a decade. “There are consequences, and we are paying for some of those consequences.”

Smuggler’s Gulch

In July 2009, a group of jubilant federal officials gathered in Smuggler’s Gulch for a ceremonial ribbon cutting ceremony atop a giant earthen berm.

It marked the completion, in less than a year, of a border construction and fencing project that sealed off what had for decades been a prime route for smugglers and unauthorized immigrants.

Contractors scraped about 1.5 million cubic yards of dirt from two mesas bordering the canyon, constructing a berm more than 100 feet high. They also added a second layer of steel mesh fencing, augmenting an existing fence, and constructed a road for U.S. Border Patrol vehicles at a cost of $48.6 million.

The Smuggler’s Gulch work was one of the more expensive stretches of fencing constructed on the border, costing about $16 million per mile. And one of the most controversial.

The project faced stiff opposition, including a 2004 lawsuit filed by the Sierra Club, San Diego Audubon Society and other environmental groups. They contended the project would add large amounts of sediment and damage to the nearby Tijuana River Estuary.

But in 2005, Congress passed legislation that allowed the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to waive all laws — state, local and federal — that could impede the construction of border fencing projects.

After the ribbon cutting ceremony, contractors and some of the federal officials left. But the controversy did not.

In the fall of 2009, critics complained that the government had botched a critical aspect of the work — reseeding the barren dirt slopes with vegetation to control erosion and runoff.

The then-leader of the California Coastal Commission fired off a letter in October saying the re-vegetation plan had “failed miserably,” largely because after seeding the slopes the federal government had not irrigated them properly.

Congresswoman Susan Davis, D-San Diego, also wrote a letter, as did the manager of the estuary reserve, expressing concern that the bare slopes would increase sediment flowing to the estuary. Storms the previous winter, when construction was underway, flooded the river valley and left behind what residents said was an unusual amount of mud.

In response, U.S. Customs and Border Protection officials said they were following a proper plan to revegetate the slopes and care for the environment.

Today, the berm slope is thick with vegetation, covering more than 70 percent of the area, said Mark Endicott, supervisory Border Patrol agent for the San Diego Sector.

The work was done over the past five years in conjunction with the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service as well as the San Diego County and California parks departments.

The plants have lessened the amount of sediment flowing into the estuary, Endicott said. Erosion pins that measure slope stability showed an average change in the height of the soil of 0.5 centimeters in 2014 to 2015, then 0.1 centimeters the following year.

“The successful revegetation of the area has resulted in little to no sedimentation into the estuary as a result of the fence project,” Endicott said.

Romo, who has worked in the valley for three decades, said other problems have occurred since the fence was built.

A concrete culvert constructed at the base of the berm now captures water from Mexico and the U.S. and funnels it into a channel. Romo said the culvert has increased the velocity of the water flowing into the channel, with damaging effect. The channel is eroding quickly, and more importantly the increased speed of the water is pushing the trash and sediment farther into the estuary than before.

Trash is now building up in parts of the reserve where it was not before, Romo said. Hauling the trash out of the environmentally sensitive estuary will be tedious and difficult, but eventually it will have to be done, he said.

“They modified the topography and created additional problems,” Romo said. The urgency to build — because of a congressional mandate in 2006 to construct at least 700 miles of fencing and barriers to make it harder for people to enter the U.S. illegally from Mexico — created problems.

“By doing this in a rush,” said Romo as he stood in front of the massive culvert where the river flows into the canyon, “they did not mitigate this well.”

But the fence has achieved its main purpose — to help reduce the number of unauthorized immigrants entering the U.S., Endicott said.

The number of apprehensions in the San Diego Sector has dropped significantly, from 118,721 in 2009 when the fencing was complete to 31,891 last year.

That drop tracks an overall decline in apprehensions across the Southwest border that has been trending down for a decade, before beginning to tick up slightly in 2015.

Organ Pipe in Arizona

Around the time that work on Smuggler’s Gulch was starting, another section of fence was being constructed to the east in Arizona.

Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument lies next to the international border, about two hours west of Tucson. In early 2008, the government built 5.2 miles of steel mesh fencing there. Activists and monument land managers said at the time they were concerned that the design would block the flow of water across the border, possibly causing floods.

But the Homeland Security Department went ahead with the $21.3 million project built by Omaha, Neb., company Kiewit. The same company built the Smuggler’s Gulch project.

A storm in July 2008 dumped about 2 inches of rain in less than 90 minutes around the border crossing town of Lukeville. The fence, even with wide iron grates at the base to allow water to flow through, essentially acted like a dam. Debris stuck against the bottom, blocking the water flow and causing flooding to the nearby port of entry as well as at businesses in Lukeville.

One company unsuccessfully sued the government for $6 million for flood damage and property loss. In the aftermath, the government installed a series of gates in the fence near Lukeville that would be lifted in times of flooding to allow water to pass through.

Then, in August 2011, another summertime storm hit — but the gates didn’t work as planned. Debris again built up at the base of the fence causing not only flooding but also knocking over a 40-foot-long section of the fence.

Randy Serraglio, Southwest conservation advocate for the Center for Biological Diversity, said the problem at Organ Pipe stemmed from the Department of Homeland Security not listening to local land managers at the monument site and area landowners who warned about the flooding dangers.

“They were told by the land manager at Organ Pipe it was not a good location to put up the infrastructure they were trying to build there,” Serraglio said. “They just really rushed forward blindly with construction.”

There has been no reported flooding in the area for several years. Border agents now routinely go on patrol and clear debris from the base of the fence, Serraglio said.

Lessons learned

Trump’s proposal for a wall is moving quickly but also hitting resistance. Customs and Border Protection is reviewing bids and hopes to select by June up to 20 companies to construct prototypes in San Diego.

In testimony this month before Congress, Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly said a solid border wall would not be built “from sea to shining sea.” Instead, he said, the department would build a wall where agents and immigration enforcement officials say one is needed.

Those who are concerned about more fencing along the border welcome such comments. “DHS should take away from what happened at Organ Pipe that there are some places where you should not build a border wall. Period,” Serraglio said.

The pressure to begin construction though is troubling to some. Imperial Beach Mayor Serge Dedina, who is also the executive director of the environmental group Wildcoast, which opposed the Smuggler’s Gulch project, said the rush to build and not weighing thoroughly what the potential problems are is the wrong course.

“That is what I get concerned about, in this rush to build a wall,” Dedina said. “We are talking about some of the most remote parts of the country. It’s simplistic to think you can plan this kind of a fence project without thinking through the engineering and earthworks that will be needed in some areas.”

The federal government spent $2.5 billion to build nearly 700 miles of fencing. Estimates for the wall Trump wants to build vary widely, from a $21 billion Homeland Security Department estimate to $38 billion in an MIT study.

In a March 28 letter to Acting Customs and Border Protection Commissioner Kevin McAleenan, U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill, a Missouri Democrat, wrote that the Homeland Security budget request for the coming year calls for $2.6 billion to build less than 75 miles of fence.

McCaskill said the figures came from a briefing CBP officials gave to members of the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee.

She pointed out the $2.6 billion request works out to a cost of $36.6 million per mile, or a total cost for the border’s 1,827 miles of $66.9 billion.

The per-mile estimate is more than than twice the per-mile cost for the Smuggler’s Gulch project eight years ago.

Border Wall Design Prototypes


UTSD

President Donald Trump’s proposed wall with Mexico will kick off in the San Diego border community of Otay Mesa, U.S. Customs and Border Protection confirmed Monday.

The community is home to one of two border crossings in San Diego and will be the site where 20 chosen bidders will erect prototypes of the envisioned wall. Winners will be selected around June 1, the agency said.

While funding for the massive infrastructure project is still not set, up to 450 companies submitted designs last week. The agency’s bid said roughly 20 companies will be selected to build the prototypes — 30 feet long and up to 30 feet high.

The models will be built on a roughly quarter-mile strip of federal land within 120 feet of the border, said a U.S. official with knowledge of the plans quoted by The Associated Press.

Border Patrol spokesman Ralph DeSio did not say exactly where the construction will take place, saying only that it would occur in the Otay Mesa area. He added that plans were subject to change.

Of the possible border locations in the region, building the prototypes near the Otay Mesa crossing makes the most sense because it allows companies to test out designs in a heavily trafficked area that still has room and flexibility, according to Eric Frost, director of San Diego State University’s graduate program in homeland security.

Frost, interviewed before the location was confirmed by the federal agency, said Otay Mesa would be a better place to start than the desert to the east or near a river — often empty locales.

“A lot of trucks already use it,” he said of the Otay Mesa crossing. “You want to look at how they actually interact with the fence.”

Construction of the models, which will likely take place in June, may attract protesters, but law enforcement officials said they were committed to supporting First Amendment rights.

“As part of our community policing philosophy, we work closely with any party or group that wishes to express their views in a law abiding manner,” San Diego police spokesman Lt. Scott Wahl said in a statement.

Officials declined to say if officers or deputies would be on site while the construction takes place, but made clear the location will be monitored by law enforcement agencies and Customs and Border Protection.

Security was already an issue for companies bidding on the wall. In a Q&A on FedBizOpps, the federal contracts website, some bidders asked what would happen if employees came under attack during construction, if they could use firearms in states with stricter gun laws and if the government would provide legal assistance if they had to use deadly force.

Customs and Border Protection officials said it would respond if needed to an attack, but that companies were responsible for their own security. The agency also would not waive state gun laws or provide legal support for deadly force.

Beyond just prototypes, CNN said it reviewed documents revealing that wall construction could start in San Diego. The initial $999 million request would fund 14 miles of new wall along the city’s border with Mexico, 28 miles of new levee wall barriers and six miles of new border wall in the Rio Grande Valley region. The request would also cover 14 miles of replacement fencing in San Diego, CNN said.

Frost said San Diego would be a good place to start the wall, as opposed to Texas where rivers and private property will likely complicate construction. Those locations are also a long way from resources needed for building.

“You’re not spending all your transportation out to nowhere,” he said.

Frost added the wall could be a benefit to both nations if, for example, it helps alleviate notoriously slow wait times for trucks crossing through Otay Mesa. He envisions an “intelligent wall” with sensors and wireless technology that can start tracking trucks before they reach a border guard, speeding up the process to move goods between the two nations.

“There’s a positive in here, if you can design a wall that works way better,” Frost said.

Funding for the wall has not been secured. Trump said during the election that Mexico would pay for the wall but has since sought out federal money. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said Sunday on ABC’s “This Week” that in a recent meeting with Mexico Foreign Minister Luis Videgaray they did not discuss Mexico paying for the wall.

Thug’s List Ensenada


Bajadock: As Angie’s list provides a listing of service providers, Ensenada now has a Lista de Ladrones(“Thugs/Malandros”) via Facebook.  We know that criminals are often caught then released.  Public servants?  Ai Yai Yai!!!

afntijuana

BC ENSENADA APRIL 2, 2017 (AFN) .- Given the increasing number of stolen vehicles, thefts in commerce and assaults, citizens of this port spread through social networks, photographs and data of alleged thieves to find their whereabouts, Recover their belongings or at least prevent the population.

This is a Facebook group called “Gallery of Malandros Ensenada“, which is about to reach 5 thousand members in just one month. According to its first publication, it was created on 28 February.

The description of the forum says “Welcome to the group, which will expose injustices and make public denunciation against the bad citizen or public servant; It remains this space to make nonconformity, complaints of robberies (in any of its kind).

He also points out that users can freely form a “gallery of mischief” to warn people, be wary of assaults, abuse of authority, corruption, or any act of “bad government” or common citizen.

Due to the implementation of the New Criminal Justice System or Adversarial Accusatory System, which prohibits the media from exposing detainees for crimes, Internet users use the social network to spread the uncensored faces of those who are criminals.

Among the publications are photographs of individuals, captured after citizen assurances or even when they are on board official vehicles. There are also images downloaded from the personal profiles of suspected thugs.

Members of the forum have shared their experiences in becoming victims of illicit acts, they also disseminate photographs of stolen vehicles and their data, they also circulate videotapes of thefts that occurred in commercial establishments or on public roads.

In the same group there are users who promote the execution of citizens against criminals; Likewise exhort the denunciation of those who sell stolen items.

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